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Andrew
Minneapolis

General Travel

What are the best travel destinations for international travel rookies?

For travelers who haven't been outside the U.S., where would you recommend they visit for their first international trip? Why?


42 Answers

top answer by
Andy from San Francisco

The biggest difficulty for rookie travelers is probably the language barrier. Rookie travelers should expect to make mistakes, and the easier it is to recover from those mistakes, the better. So I think rookie travelers should look to go to places where they will have little to no trouble communicating with the locals, where they understand the customs, and where they won't have to spend a lot of money.  

That essentially rules out most of central and South America, Africa, most of Asia, and a large portion of Europe. 

One destination that I think is great for rookie U.S. travelers is the Philippines. Little do people know but the Philippines was a U.S. colony during WWII and because of that most Filipinos grew up learning and speaking English. That means most places you'll visit you will have no trouble communicating with the locals. 

Another great thing about the Philippines is that living costs are extremely cheap. You can get a 1 bedroom suite in the middle of downtown Manila for less than $50/day. You can eat an amazing meal at a high end restaurant for less than $10. You can go out and party your head off for less than $20. You can travel like a king and still save money. 

Of course I also have to talk about how awesome the Filipino people are. They are super friendly and very welcoming. You can go pretty much anywhere and quickly make friends with the locals. Filipinos welcome foreigners and are genuinely curious about life abroad. They are also extremely generous and will make you feel like an honored guest. 

Lastly I'll mention the incredible beauty you'll find in the Philippines. The country has some of the most amazing beaches in Boracay Island

some of the best diving in Palawan

really awesome volcanoes in Mayon Volcano, and amazing rice terraces in BanaueAnd all of these destinations are within a couple of hours from Manila. 

It's still pretty surprising to me how few people talk about visiting the Philippines when they mention traveling through SEA. Honestly I think they are all missing out on one of the best kept secrets in that area of the world. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Philippines (country)
  2. Boracay Island (island)
  3. Palawan (city)
  4. Mayon Volcano (attraction)
  5. Banaue (city)
16 thankscomments (2)


answered first by
Kenneth from Germany


Andrew, me again...  I live in Europe and have for 6 yrs now.  I'd recommend Montreal...  European flair with American amenities and half the cost with no jet lag.  Fly into MTL, spend a few days there's so much culinary going on from famous restos to little known restos that are just as good.  Drive into the Laurentians and spend a day or two in Mont Tremblant.  A lovely ski village that reminds me of a chalet in the Alps... After that maybe a day again in MTL and a few days in Quebec City...  Quebec is very old world at least to me.  The town is charming and a day touring the Ile d'Orleans with many inns and vineyards (here's a link of where we stayed http://www.aubergechaumonot.com/).  Finally maybe a day up in Charlevoix Regional County Municipality a place where Presidents used to vacation...  A nice Euro starter kit and of course if you fall in love with it, like I think you will, a tour of Europe next summer!  


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Montreal (city)
  2. Mont Tremblant (city)
  3. Quebec City (city)
  4. Ile d'Orleans (island)
  5. Charlevoix Regional County Municipality (metro area)
9 thankscomments (3)


answered by
Emily from Otavalo, Ecuador

I think Ireland is a great first trip for people! No language barrier if you are from the U.S. and the people are super friendly. I got off the bus in Dublin and was looking for the hostel I was staying at, and someone came up to me and said that I looked lost and asked if he could help. I told him where I was going and he walked me there! I traveled all through the country and everyone I met was the same! Very willing to help you out, find a place, or treat you to a pint!


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Ireland (country)
  2. Dublin (city)
7 thankscomments (2)


answered by
Mark from Nassau, New Providence

The Bahamas. I am may be a little biased as a citizen and resident, but the Bahamas is an ideal destination for first time travelers outside of the U.S. Only 179 miles from Florida, it is about a 45 minute flight from Miami, or for those nervous of air travel, a short crossing by boat. To sweeten the deal for first time travelers, there's also no visa requirements for visitors to the country. 

 

While the capital Nassau has it's examples of colonial architecture and fine dining in the form of Café Matisse, Mahogany House and Graycliff, it's essentially an overpopulated city and a 'Tourist Trap' with few redeeming qualities. 

 

My suggestion is to hop an inter island flight or ferry (there are over 700 islands in the Bahamas) to Eleuthera, Long Island (Bahamas) or the Exuma. Within an hour you can then step back in time and visit small friendly communities and idyllic empty beaches, explore caves, snorkel reefs and feast on the bountiful local seafood simply prepared including spiny lobster, grouper, snapper and stone crab.  

 

If none of this is enough to entice you, there's always a hammock in the palm trees and cool ocean breezes. 

 

Hope you make it down here soon, Andrew! 

 

P.S. I don't know if you've tried sheep tongue or pig's feet souse but we've got some bizarre foods too!


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Bahamas (attraction)
  2. Café Matisse (restaurant)
  3. Mahogany House (restaurant)
  4. Graycliff (hotel)
  5. Eleuthera (city)
  6. Long Island (Bahamas) (city)
  7. Exuma (state)
7 thankscomments (3)


answered by
Melissa from Metro Manila

Aside from the obvious choice that I'd pick my own country of course, I'd probably suggest Singapore since you wouldn't worry about language barriers since they speak pretty decent English despite having slight regional modifications to it. Their airport is definitely world-class, the public transportation is pretty easy to understand and get the hang of, and there are so many things to see from Sentosa Island to Marina Bay Sands. Shopping is a must, whether in the dozens of shopping malls along Orchard Road, the cheap night market in Bugis Junction or the humongous shopping complex that is Mustafa Shopping Centre. Though some hotels are really pricey, you'd be surprised to find there are accommodation options for every budget if you research well enough. Nightlife is good too, despite beer and cocktail prices being slightly steep than most in the SEA region, but Geylang and Clarke Quayhave some nice happy hours that are worth checking out. And one of the things I highly consider when travelling is the food culture of the place, and Singapore has an amazingly vibrant one. I love the hawkers especially the one in Tiong Bahru and the night food market in Chinatown, and Makansutra Gluttons Bay is a must-visit. Even Changi Airport Singapore has great food options in Changi Village Food Centre.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Singapore (country)
  2. Sentosa Island (island)
  3. Marina Bay Sands (hotel)
  4. Orchard Road (attraction)
  5. Bugis Junction (attraction)
  6. Mustafa Shopping Centre (attraction)
  7. Geylang (attraction)
  8. Clarke Quay (attraction)
  9. Tiong Bahru (attraction)
  10. Chinatown (hotel)
  11. Makansutra Gluttons Bay (attraction)
  12. Changi Airport Singapore (attraction)
  13. Changi Village Food Centre (attraction)
6 thankscomments (1)


answered by
Staci from Cleveland

Hi Andrew!! My vote goes to Italy because that was my first international trip and I didn't have any issues. Language isn't a major barrier. The only places I had a small issue was in Sicily and small towns/islands in southern Italy. 

Also, if you're a picky eater you can find a lot of familiar foods to eat in this country. The locals are also kind. Traveling from place to place is simple with the rail system. Basically, I fell in love with the place and had the time of my life. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Italy (country)
  2. Sicily (island)
5 thanks


answered by
Ross from Fort Collins

Asia. Singapore

americas. Costa Rica

Europe. Spain


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Singapore (country)
  2. Costa Rica (country)
  3. Spain (country)
4 thanks


answered by
Jason from Arlington (Virginia)

EnglandScotland, and Ireland are great places to start.  There are enough similarities to the US that you won't be blown away but enough differences to make you appreciate other cultures.  Also, if you are into history, castles, or just beautiful scenery you are in for a treat.  Europe in general is great because you can see such a variety of cultures and landscapes in a small geographical area.

From the UK I would probably go to Western Europe.  France, Spain, Germany, Netherlands, Austria, Italy etc.  Most Europeans speak English as well as their native language so the language barrier really isn't a big deal.  As far as European cities go, these ones are a must:  LondonParisAmsterdamBerlinPragueRome.  Each city has its own appeal, you'll have to decide what you like best.  Once you hit the major areas then I would explore from there.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. England (country)
  2. Scotland (country)
  3. Ireland (country)
  4. London (city)
  5. Paris (city)
  6. Amsterdam (city)
  7. Berlin (city)
  8. Prague (city)
  9. Rome (city)
4 thanks


answered by
Carlyle from Washington, DC

I have a few countries to recommend - Canada, Mexico, England, Holland and Denmark are pretty easy to adjust and all primarily speak English with exception of Mexico.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Canada (country)
  2. Mexico (country)
  3. England (country)
  4. Holland (city)
  5. Denmark (country)
4 thanks


answered by
Ashley from Calgary

London because there isn't a language barrier, food is pretty similar and it's relatively easy to get around. Berlin is also great, everyone speaks English, lots of food options, easy to navigate. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. London (city)
  2. Berlin (city)
3 thankscomments (1)


answered by
Nathaniel from Boston

New Zealand. Hands down.

Nearly the entire country is setup for new travelers of every kind to plugin to the backpacking or independent travel networks, and see everything it has to offer. It's a remote destination that offers everything from beaches to mountains (okay, no deserts), from culture to solitude. People are distinctly different (even to Aussies), yet friendly and English-speaking. Plus it's arguably the most beautiful country in the world.

And most importantly, you can learn to do any sort of travel or adventure or exploration from here, in preparation for the harder places, with less infrastructure.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. New Zealand (country)
3 thanks


answered by
Cherie from Bay Area

I'm going to have to say the Kansai area of Japan, most notably KyotoKobe, and Osaka

While there is the element of the language barrier, it's also part of the adventure. Generally, people are very friendly and it's possible to get around knowing minimal Japanese (i.e. Train stations usually have the English word along with the Japanese characters)

Hint: Look for students if you have a question – they're more likely to feel confident speaking English. 

Besides the natural beauty, historical sites, and amazing places to eat, I think the biggest advantage of this being a first international trip for rookies is safety. Japan is notoriously safe – travelers would not have to worry about being pick-pocketed or scammed. The second biggest advantage would have to be transit – it's clean and efficient and will take you to most places you want to go. You can also purchase a Japan Rail Pass in your own country. 

<3 Nihon!! 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Kyoto (city)
  2. Kobe (city)
  3. Osaka (city)
3 thanks


answered by
Alisa from Dublin

I agree with Emily Della Fera - Irelandis fantastic, for rookies and experienced travellers! I have travelled quite a bit over the past 3 years and am now living in Dublin. No one beats the Irish for their friendliness and willingness to help a stranger. I don't even think the word 'stranger' exists over here - in my observations, the Irish treat each other with such a warm, easy-going attitude - I've never seen anything like it. Plus, there isn't much of a language barrier - notice I said 'much' since some of those accents can be quite thick! :) And for photography, the Irish countryside is hard to beat. My biggest word of advice would be to get out of the big city of Dublin and go explore the small towns!


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Ireland (country)
  2. Dublin (city)
3 thanks


answered by
claus

I would recommend Laos

Super interesting and very exotic country that is cheap and safe to travel and it's not as over crowded with western tourists as Thailand is.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Laos (country)
  2. Thailand (country)
3 thanks


answered by
Jenna from Oakville, Ontario

This is going to be the first and likely last time I say this but I always think it helps to follow the 'tourist trail' when you're a new traveller, especially if you're a new SOLO traveller .. let me add female to that as well!
 
When I'm travelling solo, I often wish I could take the 'off the beaten path' route but at the same time it's important to stay safe. 

This is when I would recommend tour groups - I haven't taken one but I know my sister loved G Adventures and Contiki Tours. 

I travelled solo to India and ended up working for an Internship company called Leave Ur Mark. This is where I met other travellers in the area and ended up making long lasting friends who could then explore the 'off the beaten track' destinations with me! :D 

Countries I'd suggest? 
Thailand
Germany
Caribbean Sea
Australia

Hope this helps! :D 

Jenna 
http://www.giveforgranted.com


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Thailand (country)
  2. Germany (country)
  3. Caribbean Sea (region)
  4. Australia (country)
3 thanks


answered by
Jaleh from Baltimore

I am not sure when one is no longer considered a rookie since I still feel like one when I visit a new country, but for people who are really green, there are three places I would suggest. PragueLisbon, and Dublin are all very different areas, but offer similar benefits for new travelers. The food is fantastic, the people are incredibly friendly, they're three of the cities I've felt safest in, and (as much as my Spanish-major-self may hate this) it's easy to get by in English.Also, they're easy cities to navigate with activities like Prague Castle or Guinness Factory Tourto appeal to a wide range of interests. While I think travel should really be about pushing boundaries, these cities are all amazing while also easing a newcomer into international travel. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Prague (city)
  2. Lisbon (city)
  3. Dublin (city)
  4. Prague Castle (attraction)
  5. Guinness Factory Tour (attraction)
3 thanks


answered by
Adrian from Nicaragua

I'm a travel rookie, and I'm also from the States. I think it would really depend on where you are originally from, and what kind of traveler you think you'll be. For example, if you're a budget traveler from the States, checkout Central America. If you're from Australia, save lots of money first and then go everywhere you can because flights are so expensive to and from Aus/NewZeal. If you have a more specific idea let me know and I'll try to help more!


3 thanks


answered by
Z from Los Angeles

In Asia, I agree Singapore is definitely a nice toe-dip for "beginners" - safe, clean, diverse, and friendly, with minimal language barriers. 

 

But even I - admittedly a bit jaded and preferring more exotic destinations - still love to return often for the food. The locals have a long proud history as *serious* foodies (and the hygiene is super clean), so treat every meal as an opportunity not to be missed. The vast choices are inspired by cuisines from around the eastern hemisphere. In my personal opinion, it's the best place to eat in the world!  

 

Enjoy!  

And take stretchy pants :)


2 thanks


answered by
Paula from Chicago

Really, most Europeans nowadays speak English and do not hesitate, the one possible exception being France so I don't think language should be a huge barrier.


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answered by
Peter from Bloomington (Indiana)

I scanned the answers here and I can't believe no one has mentioned Paris. In my mind, every stream of history, culture, politics and business converge in Paris. You're asking where I'd advise a "travel rookie" to go. I tried to make a distinction in my mind between rookies who are looking forward to a long lifetime of foreign travel and those who might never go overseas again. It makes no difference. The one most essential destination in the world, regardless, is Paris. 

(Runner up: Rome, but it comes in second because for a first-time foreign traveler, Rome can be a much more stressful place to get around.)


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Paris (city)
  2. Rome (city)
2 thanks


answered by
Kyle from Costa Mesa

If you're looking for great beaches and other natural wonders, Costa Rica for sure.  It's pretty heavily tourist-ed so you can get by just fine without knowing any Spanish.

There are also tons of guided and organized tours if you want to check those out or if you decide to do activities on your own, there are tons of easily found resources (both on the interweb and in person) on what you can do and how to get there.

It's foreign enough to push you out of your comfort zone without ever becoming too uncomfortable.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Costa Rica (country)
2 thanks


answered by
Irene from Pretoria

Andrew, for a first time traveller I suggest you take a coach tour.  I would suggest Croatia, Slovenia and Slovakia as well as Bosnia and Herzegovina.  Any former East block countries.  Once you get the lie of the land you are good to go on your own.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Croatia (country)
  2. Slovenia (country)
  3. Slovakia (country)
  4. Bosnia and Herzegovina (country)
2 thanks


answered by
Allie from Charleston

I say Vietnam... it has the benefit of having a very different culture than the US (as opposed to say... Australia, so you know you're not in America), beautiful scenery, great food, tons to do, and enough Western influence (and English speakers) that they won't be too intimidated


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Vietnam (country)
  2. Australia (country)
2 thanks


answered by
Larry from Fort Wayne, Indiana

Hong Kong. ..Is a great place to go the first time out of the states, the reasons why most people speak English and it is a very clean and safe place, but you can still get the feel of another country and have fun....It was my first place I went out of country.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Hong Kong (city)
2 thanks


answered by
Dabs from Chicago

I usually recommend London, there's no language barrier (or should I say not much of a language barrier!), it's a fascinating city with lots to do, you can read all of the signs, the food is varied but not exotic and there are a lot of direct flights from the US.  It's different enough that you feel like you are in a foreign country but not so different that travel newbies would feel overwhelmed.  It's where I went for my 1st trip and after that I was hooked!

I suppose Ireland would also be a good suggestion based on the above reasoning, Aer Lingus runs a lot of specials from certain cities in the US and their fares are generally less than flying into London.  Or Scotland, both are very tourist friendly and both quite interesting.

Mexico is another good option, one I'm thinking of since the weather is getting cold.  Some might argue that the experiences in the resort areas are not authentic but you can get an authentic experience (or not) if that is what you are looking for.  We go every year and sometimes we get off the tourist path and sometimes we just veg on the beach.

Canada doesn't even feel like an international destination to me, except when they say the word "about" :-)  Toronto is so similar to Chicago that they use it to film shows set in the Windy City.  The exception would be places in Quebec since there is dual language spoken there.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. London (city)
  2. Ireland (country)
  3. Scotland (country)
  4. Mexico (country)
  5. Canada (country)
  6. Quebec (region)
2 thanks


answered by
Jacey & Scott from Fort Collins

My first thought was someplace that speaks mostly English as this will provide a sense of comfort and eliminate one very powerful part of confusion while traveling.  Then I thought it would need to be somewhere friendly and helpful.  My next though was Scotland.  The Scottish folks are about as friendly as you will find in this world.  They instantly become your best friend after a 5 minute conversation.  And...the country is spectacularly beautiful, easy to access (multiple flights to multiple cities), has easy rail access (no renting cars).  I think it prepares a first time traveler well for the next trip too.  Scottish accents can be hard to understand, so they may have to work through a bit of a language barrier-but they will-so it gives them some confidence to try an actual foreign speaking nation later. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Scotland (country)
2 thanks


answered by
José from Canidelo, Porto, Portugal

Hello Andrew. I am from Porto a city in Portugal. Porto its a mystic city that can offer many types off things depending on what type of travel you wanna have. From one of the best (i cant say the best since i didn't try all) food and wines in the world. In Porto you gone find liberal and pleasant people always ready to speak to you and receive you. We have a great history to show, great places to see, huge amount of activities to make your stay memorable.

You can check for yourself a little bit of us on this video

http://vimeo.com/atmosaerialfilming/portoebd2014


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Porto (city)
2 thanks


answered by
Katherine from San Diego

For travelers who haven't been outside of the United States, I would recommend Rome for their first international trip.  While there is a language difference, pretty much everyone in Rome speaks English.  The main reason I choose Rome is because there are so many recognizable tourist sites there is no way someone visiting Rome will be unhappy, and then they will be bitten by the travel bug and want to travel internationally more often.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Rome (city)
2 thanks


answered by
Michael from London

Australia!

it is a long trip, but great fun, relaxed, safe and did I mention fun?

Great food, interesting and different wildlife, fantastic beaches, wierd sports (great cultural experiences to be had).

FUN, safe... you really can't go wrong.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Australia (country)
2 thanks


answered by
Gerry from Boston

I would say, Europe.

So many places to visit, easy to get around, countries where you will always feel safe!!!


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Europe (continent)
2 thanks


answered by
Michelle from Melbourne

For me, it's Singapore  - great things to do, see and eat in one of the easiest cities to get around. Some elements of the city can be a bit expensive, but if you search you can find some pretty good hotels. Drinking in Singapore can also get a bit pricey but there are also some great happy hours. It's my home away from home. I go a few times each year just to eat. Amazing food culture.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Singapore (country)
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answered by
Gina from Brooklyn

I have been to a few places outside the U.S. One place that I would definitely go back to, as well as recommend to novice international travelers would have to be Costa Rica. I think I had the best roasted garlic lobster in Jaco Beach at a great price!!!  I also stayed at the Arenal Paraiso Hotel Resort & Spa which had the best spa treatment, natural hot springs, and beautiful views.  Costa Rica is great, the people are nice, and if planned right budget friendly!


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Costa Rica (country)
  2. Jaco Beach (attraction)
  3. Arenal Paraiso Hotel Resort & Spa (hotel)
2 thanks


answered by
Mary from Louisiana

Ok, I'm not as well traveled as many of the fine people here, but after Katrina, I decided I had to get outo of Louisiana for a while, and took a job on a cruise ship. Not only did I get to see many ports of call (and went through the Panama Canal; its my all time favorite travel memory while working), I met many people from many, many different cultures. Long story short, a cruise is a great way to dip your toe into traveling the globe. If you're the seasick type, then I would go with a resort in the Caribbean, where, once you get there, you have a home base and there are often resort sponsored guided excursions to join in on. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Panama Canal (attraction)
  2. Caribbean (island)
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answered by
Justin from Phoenix

My first international trip as an adult was Costa Rica. I spoke a bit of Spanish and had a minimal budget ... things went just fine. It's not far from home, it's friendly, it's familiar (linguistically for a guy from the Southwest). I think it's a great place to get started in international travel. 


2 thanks


answered by
Scott from Fort Collins

I guess I look at it from three different viewpoints. It's an American way to look at it, since that's where I'm from.  It will be interesting to hear other non American viewpoints on this too. For those that want to see a different country, but are not yet too comfortable outside the borders, I would say western Canada.  Out of the country, but very familiar.  I would also include Riviera Maya, as it is easy to get to and most resorts are all inclusive, giving you an "insulator," but also the ability to get out and explore.  For the people that want quick and easy flights, but an additional layer, I would say The BahamasPuerto Rico, or Virgin Islands.  For the last group that maybe wants to venture out a little further, I would suggest England, or Scotland.  I think all are relatively easy first time trips, with a pretty good built in comfort level that most first timers probably would prefer.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Riviera Maya (city)
  2. The Bahamas (island)
  3. Puerto Rico (country)
  4. Virgin Islands (country)
  5. England (country)
  6. Scotland (country)
2 thanks


answered by
Richard


  • Toronto or Montreal, Canada! That was easy. You can begin in a country that is friendly, speaks English, has different money and has multiple cultures to experience. It won't cost a lot to get there and being below the tourist's radar, will be a somewhat genuine journey.Discovery just beyond familiar- a fine place to start.
  • Bonus! You can visit Niagara Falls on the way.

Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Toronto (city)
  2. Montreal (city)
  3. Niagara Falls (city)
1 thanks


answered by
Stephen "Sven" from Florida

Well the answer to this question is based upon where you live (West Coast requires longer plane ride if you are not going to Canada), what your likes are (Snow Skiing, Snorkeling, Mountains, Beach or somewhere in between), what your dislikes and comfortability with travel are (prefer some place that speaks English or a language you are comfortable with). If you do not think you can travel by being in a plane for 6 hours or more. I would recommend going to Canada or the Caribbean. The culture is similar to the USA but still has its differences Ay. If you think you can stand being in a plane for 6 hours or more. Then I would recommend United Kingdom, The Netherlands or Ireland as you still get a taste for travel and visiting a foreign country and do not have to worry about the language. Also the history, food and sites are fantastic. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Canada (country)
  2. Caribbean (island)
  3. United Kingdom (country)
  4. Netherlands (country)
1 thankscomments (1)


answered by
Rona from New York City

UK. It is easier to travel where English is spoken, and closer than Aust. And NZ


1 thanks


answered by
Irene from Pretoria

Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovenia, Slovakia. All former East Block Countries


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Croatia (country)
  2. Bosnia and Herzegovina (country)
  3. Slovenia (country)
  4. Slovakia (country)
1 thanks


answered by
Roxanne from Montreal

For someone who whants to ease in the traveling world from the US is Montreal and Quebec City.  These cities will give you a first taste of France. French speeking but with a touch of english, even a bit of Great Britan in some spots of Montreal.  And the best thing, a lot less expensive...


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answered by
Janelle from Charleston

I'd recommend someplace where English is the official language.  Being in a place where you don't speak the language, can't understand the road signs, etc. is the most daunting thing for an international travel newbie.  Best to get your feet wet and learn the basics of international travel in an English-speaking country, then move on to non-English speaking countries after you get more comfortable with international travel.

If you're looking for history/culture, then I'd recommend United Kingdom or Ireland.  If you want beaches, then I'd recommend somewhere in the English speaking Caribbean, e.g. The Bahamas, Cayman Islands or Montego Bay, Jamaica.  If you want outdoor adventure, then I'd recommend New Zealand.  If you want a safari, then South Africa or Namibia.  If you're a scuba diver, then Australia or Palau.  If you're a foodie, then Hong Kong or Singapore.


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. United Kingdom (country)
  2. Ireland (country)
  3. The Bahamas (island)
  4. Cayman Islands (attraction)
  5. Montego Bay (city)
  6. New Zealand (country)
  7. South Africa (country)
  8. Namibia (country)
  9. Australia (country)
  10. Palau (country)
  11. Hong Kong (city)
  12. Singapore (country)


answered by
Diep from Thuy Anh, Thái Bình, Vietnam

Southeast Asia is a wonderful place to visit with cheap price. Almost countries in SEA  are so easy to travel with the budget. Moreover, you can transfer to country to others by bus or cheap flight very easy. 


Mentioned in this answer:

  1. Southeast Asia (region)




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