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a VirtualTourist member from Hengelo

Miscellaneous

How do you call that end of a loaf of bread?

Just curious, how you call that first end last slice of bread with crust on one side in your language?

I'm just eating a "Kapje", as we call it in Dutch.



PJ



41 Answers  (showing 1 - 30)


answered by
daarth (VT refugee) from Bergen

Skorpe (crust)




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from New Jersey

We call it the heel of the loaf.




answered by
daarth (VT refugee) from Bergen

My favourite German bread expression is "hazenbrot" (did I spell that correct?)




answered by
Mary Smith from Leicester

No special name here, just 'the crust', although there may be dialect words of which I am not aware (my local dialect had none).




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Virginia

We call it the heel or the crust. ~




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Port Alberni

I call it the "heel" also.




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from New York City

I remembered that we call it the "heel" as well right before read the other replies. I feel every slice has a crust, but the heel is pretty much all crust.




answered by
Mary Smith from Leicester

We call it the heel too, but I think that's just what's left of the loaf rather than the first crusty slice.




answered by
daarth (VT refugee) from Bergen

"Hasenbrot" is an expression for the leftover sandwiches you eat the next day when they have become rather dry, and you nibble on them like a rabbit...

Or after you come home from the picnic! ;o)




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Sydney

I dont know, but according to my mother they make your hair go curly.




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Norway

maybe its a dialect thing,, i call it SKALK,, the "skorpe" ( crust) is the hard stuff outside all of the bread:)

the heel is called SKALK in my dialect




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Vienna

I don't know PJ but I do not eat them.




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Brunei

whatever it is called, i simply love them!




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Bitola

Kraeshnik in Macedonian. I love the first crusty bit of the loaf.
When I was child, mum would send me to buy bread 9we do not have sliced bread in Macedonia), and most times than not I will bring warm crusty bread with two ends missing!




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Edinburgh

here in Edinburgh it's the 'heel' of the loaf - but in Glasgow they call them the 'outsiders' (quite like that)




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Carrum

the crust

a slice has a crust but the crust is the end of the bread

like outsiders




answered by
daarth (VT refugee) from Bergen

Speaking of bread PJ, in Amsterdam you have a funny way of serving soup! It's a hollowed out bread:
[original VT link]




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Edinburgh

Oxy has a penchant for 'snaffling' the outsiders before anyone else dets them. Nice and crisp/butter. mmmmmmm




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Beersheba

Hi and Shalom:
In the US we called them "heels" or "butts". The crust is that part of the bread that encompasses the entire soft center, so the slices as well as the ends have a crust.
Here in Israel one term is "nishekoat", literally "kisses".
My wife loves them. When we share bread she will often eat the "crusty" exterior while I eat the softer center.
Martin




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Haugesund

i call it skalk too ( same as iver) and skorpe for hard part around the slice of bread




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Hengelo

David, you really missed the Krakow meeting. We had a great mushroom soup served in a bread cup with cap. Wonderful how the bread mixed with the soup.

See: [original VT link]

MENU:
1. Soup: Forest mushroom soup served in bread.


I saw a lot of crust that night!

PJ




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Melbourne

Never heard the ends of the loaf of bread called anything but 'the crusts' - and I love them when fresh, not so nice when stale except dunked into soup or toasted under the griller with cheese etc.




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Piest'any

koncek - means a little end, or kropec - cannot translate.
I love it too :-)




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Barcelona

'crostó' in Catalan
'cuscurro' in Spanish
I love them when it's good crusty farmer's bread!




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Tel Aviv-Yafo

He he Martin, sorry to correct, but tons of Israelis make the same mistake. In Hebrew it is called "Leshika", but many call it "Neshika" instead :)

Nat




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Kragujevac

In Serbian: krajka.




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Slovenia

Slovenian: krajček (kraichek), krajec (krajets)

Croatian: okrajak, krajac (krajats)




answered by
Mary Smith from Leicester

In the UK, we say that if you don't eat your crusts your hair will never be curly.




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Hengelo

I notice in many languages the "kr" sound is part of the word.

I wonder if that stands for the grinding sound when you eat the end of the loaf?


PJ




answered by
a VirtualTourist member from Barcelona

sure, I thought the same

kr kr krrr.... mmmmm! ;-)




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